US History
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Textbook Website: The America's - Reconstruction to the 21st Century
  • The textbook's website is not an exact replica of the our physical textbook, but it does have a wealth of study materials that will help students with homework and supplement in-class instruction.

Monday, August 22

Calendar for the Remainder of the 2011-12 School Year
  • The 1950s: Post War America & The Civil Rights Movement
    • February 29-March 17

    • Newspaper Project
  • Spring Break
    • March 19-23
  • The 1960s: Kennedy, Johnson, Vietnam & The Counterculture
    • March 26-April 6
  • The 1970s: Nixon, Detente, Watergate and Ford
    • April 9-April 20
  • The 1980s: Carter, Reagan, & George H.W. Bush
    • April 23-May 4
  • The 1990s to Today: The Clinton Years, The Election of 2000, George W. Bush & The War on Terrorism, and Obama
    • May 7-May 16
  • Semester Tests
    • Thursday, May 17
    • Friday, May 18
    • Monday, May 21


The Cold War Begins (1945-1963)
Quiz: Tuesday, February 28

I can statements:
  • I can explain America’s policy of containment and its impact on the world.
  • I can compare and contrast the varying foreign policies of American Presidents during the post war world. (Truman to Kennedy)
  • I can identify landmark events of the Cold War (1945-1963).

Learning Targets:
  1. Origins of the Cold War
  2. Truman and containment
  3. The Cold War in Asia: China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan
  4. Diplomatic strategies and policies of the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations
  5. The Red Scare and McCarthyism
  6. The impact of the Cold War on American society

Wednesday, February 8

Thursday, February 9

Friday, February 10
  • The Truman Doctrine
    • Containment
    • The Marshall Plan

Monday, February 13
  • Mr. Jorth will be gone - Psychology Field Trip
  • 1:30 Early Out
  • Map Activity: NATO & The Warsaw Pact

Tuesday, February 14
  • 9th Grade Explore Testing
    • 2nd Hour - NO CLASS
    • 7th Hour 2:00-3:00
  • Video: The Cold War
    • T-Chart Notes (Aha v. Duh)

Wednesday, February 15
  • 9th Grade Explore Testing
    • 2nd Hour 7:55-8:55
    • 7th Hour - NO CLASS
  • Video: The Cold War
    • T-Chart Notes (Aha v. Duh)

Monday, February 20
  • Current Events

Tuesday, February 21
  • Cold War Heats Up
    • China Falls to Communism
    • The Korean Conflict: Containment not War

Wednesday, February 22
  • Eisenhower & The Cold War
    • Brinksmanship & Covert Operations
    • Flashpoints: Iran, Egypt, Hungary, & the U-2 Incident

Thursday, February 23
  • Kennedy & The Cold War
    • Massive Retaliation
    • Flashpoints: The Bay of Pigs, The Cuban Missile Crisis & The Berlin Wall

Friday, February 24
  • The Red Scare & McCarthyism
    • Flashpoints: HUAC, Espionage (Alger Hiss & The Rosenbergs), and Joseph McCarthy's "Witch Hunt"

Monday, February 27

Tuesday, February 28
  • Quiz: The Cold War Begins

America & World War II
Quiz: Friday, February 3

Tuesday, February 7
I can statements:
  • I can identify the causes of World War II.
  • I can explain why America abandoned isolationism as its foreign policy and joined the Allies.
  • I can describe what America’s home front was like during the war.
  • I can argue whether or not the use of nuclear weapons was justified to bring World War II to an end?

Learning Targets:
1) The rise of fascism and militarism in Japan, Italy, and Germany
2) Prelude to war: America’s policy of neutrality
3) The attack on Pearl Harbor and United States declaration of war
4) Fighting a multi-front war; diplomacy, war aims, and wartime conferences
5) The United States as a global power in the Atomic Age

Wednesday, January 18
Thursday, January 19
Friday, January 20
  • The Causes of the First World War
    • Timeline Review
    • FADD
      • Failures of the League of Nation
      • Appeasement of Hitler
      • Dictators Rise to Power
      • Depression Goes Global
    • Sparks
      • Nazis BLITZ Poland (Sept. 1, 1939)
      • Japanese BOMB Pearl Harbor (Dec. 7, 1941)

Monday, January 23
  • Current Events Day: iPad Cart

Tuesday, January 24
  • American Neutrality

Wednesday, January 25
  • Early Out

Thursday, January 26
  • European Theater: Graphic Organizer

Friday, January 27
  • The Holocaust: KNL Chart

Monday, January 30
  • Pacific Theater: Timeline

Tuesday, January 31

Wednesday, February 1

Thursday, February 2
  • The Homefront

Friday, February 3

Monday, February 6
  • Current Events Day
    • OR
  • Finalize 1-Page Document for In-class Essay

Tuesday, February 7


FDR, The New Deal, and The Great Depression
Quiz: Tuesday, January 17
I can statements:
  • I can explain the goals of FDR’s First 100 Days and the objectives of The New Deal.
  • I can describe how organized labor benefitted from New Deal reforms.
  • I can identify those that supported and criticized FDR and The New Deal.
  • I can provide examples that highlight the “hard times” individuals faced during the Great Depression.
Learning Targets
1) Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the New Deal
2) Labor and Union Recognition
3) The New Deal coalition and its Critics from the Right and the Left
4) Surviving hard times: American society during the Great Depression

Wednesday, January 4
Thursday, January 5

Friday, January 6
  • Continue Movie: The Grapes of Wrath

Monday, January 9
  • Continue Movie: The Grapes of Wrath

Tuesday, January 10
  • Complete Movie: The Grapes of Wrath

Wednesday, January 11
  • iPad Cart: Current Events (New Hampshire Primary Results)
  • Discussion Post
    • Who is FDR?
    • How bad was the Great Depression?

Thursday, January 12
  • Reading: Roosevelt & The New Deal
  • Notes: FDR & The First 100 Days
  • Graphic Organizer: Alphabet Soup Agencies

Friday, January 13
  • Graphic Organizer: The New Deal Coalition & Critics of the New Deal

Monday, January 16
  • Current Events Day: iPad Cart
  • Review Game

Tuesday, January 17
  • Quiz: FDR, The New Deal & The Great Depression

The Roaring 20s, The Crash, & The Causes of the Great DepressionQuiz: Friday, December 16
I can statements:
  • I can explain why the 1920s are often referred to as the “Roaring 20s” and the “Jazz Age.”
  • I can identify the factors that led to American consumerism during the 1920s.
  • I can highlight how the Republican Presidents of the 1920s were different than the Presidents of the Progressive Era.
  • I can identify the struggles minorities (women, African Americans, and immigrants) faced during the 1920s.
  • I can identify the causes of The Great Depression.
  • I can explain President Hoover and the government’s response to the stock market crash and resulting depression.



Learning Targets:
  • The business of America and the consumer economy
  • Republican politics: Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover
  • The culture of Modernism: science, the arts, and entertainment
  • Responses to Modernism: religious fundamentalism, nativism, and Prohibition
  • The ongoing struggle for equality: African Americans and women
  • Causes of the Great Depression
  • Hoover’s administration’s response
  • Surviving hard times: American society during the Great Depression

Monday, November 28

Tuesday, November 29

Wednesday, November 30
  • Graphic Organizer: Nativism
    • Reading: KKK of the 1920s
    • Anti-Immigration (p. 415-7)
    • The Red Scare (p. 413-4)

Thursday, December 1
  • Graphic Organizer: Republican Presidents of the 1920s
    • Warren G. Harding
    • Calvin Coolidge
    • Herbert Hoover

Friday, December 2

Monday, December 5
  • Graphic Organizer: American Business in the 1920s

Tuesday, December 6
  • Graphic Organizer: American Business in the 1920s

Wednesday, December 7

Thursday, December 8
  • Notes: The Roaring 20s & The Jazz Age
    • Mass Media
    • Celebrities
      • Icons
      • Sports
      • Movies
      • Literature
    • The Harlem Renaissance
    • The Flapper
    • Prohibition & Organized Crime
    • Secularism v. Fundamentalism
    • Superficial Prosperity

Friday, December 9
  • Review Day
    • Mr. Jorth is not at school today
    • Students should use their time in class to work on completing their review sheet.

Monday, December 12
  • Video: The Stock Market Crash & Hoover's Response
  • The DUMB Causes of the Great Depression
    • Depressed Farms & Industry
    • Unequal Distribution of Wealth
    • Monetary Policy Flawed
    • Banks Fail

Tuesday, December 13

Wednesday, December 14

Thursday, December 15

Friday, December 16
  • Quest: The Roaring 20s, The Crash & The Causes of the Great Depression
    • 40-50 points possible

Semester Test Week
Monday, December 19
  • Review Day
    • Exam #1: The Wild West (Purple)
    • Exam #2: Industrialism & Immigration (Yellow)
    • Exam #3: Urbanization & ImmigrationThe Gilded Age (Orange)
    • Exam #4: The Progressive Era ((Brown)
    • Exam #5: The Emergence of America (Cream)
    • Exam #6: The Roaring 20s, The Crash & The Causes of the Great Depression

Tuesday, December 20
  • 2nd Hour: Exam Time 8:00 AM

Wednesday, December 21
  • No US HISTORY EXAMS

Thursday, December 22
  • 7th Hour: Exam Time 8:00 AM
Current Events Week

Monday, November 21
  • Budget Battle: Super Committee Potential Failure

Tuesday, November 22
  • Meet the Press Interviews

Wednesday, November 23
  • Current Event Post

The Emergence of America as a World Power
Quiz: Friday, November 18

I can statements:
  • I can identify the causes of World War I.
  • I can explain why America abandoned isolationism as its foreign policy and joined the Allies.
  • I can describe what America’s home front was like during the war.
  • I can identify the impact of Wilson’s 14 Points on the post war world.

Monday, October 31
Tuesday, November 1
  • ITED Testing Day
    • 2nd Hour Class Time - 11:10-12:40
    • 7th Hour - NO CLASS

Wednesday, November 2
  • ITED Testing Day
    • 2nd Hour Class Time - NO CLASS
    • 7th Hour - 12:50-1:50

Monday, November 7
  • HOMEWORK: Signed Goal Sheet/Grade Sheet
    • 10 points
  • American Foreign Policy: Imperialism to Isolationism (Reading & Notes)
    • The Monroe Doctrine to Manifest Destiny to The Roosevelt Corollary
    • Notes

Tuesday, November 8
  • American Foreign Policy: Imperialism to Isolationism (Reading & Notes)
    • The Monroe Doctrine to Manifest Destiny to The Roosevelt Corollary

Wednesday, November 9
  • The MAIN Causes of World War I (Reading & Notes)

Thursday, November 10
  • American Neutrality (Reading & Notes)
    • The Outbreak of the War
    • Lusitania
    • The Zimmerman Note

Friday, November 11

Monday, November 14
  • World War I Obituaries
    • Sharing Student Work

Tuesday, November 15

Wednesday, November 16
  • The Home Front (Continue & Complete)

Thursday, November 17
  • Wilson's 14 Points & The Post War Reality (Reading & Notes)

Friday, November 18


Unit #4: The Progressive Era Quiz: Friday, October 28
I can statements:
  • I can summarize the events in American history that led to Progressive Era.
  • I can highlight the successes and failures of the Progressive Presidents: Roosevelt, Taft & Wilson.
  • I can explain how women were treated and impacted the Progressive Era.
  • I can describe what life was like for Black Americans during the Progressive Era.

Wednesday, October 12

Thursday, October 13

Friday, October 14
  • Continue Lecture: "Who are the Progressives"

Monday, October 17
  • DUE: Final Discussion Post for the Quarter (8 total = 40 pts for the quarter)
  • Work Time: Progressive Trading Card Project

Tuesday, October 18

Wednesday, October 19
  • Continue Lecture: "Who Are The Progressives"

Thursday, October 20
  • Progressive Presidents: Teddy Roosevelt, William H. Taft & Woodrow Wilson

Friday, October 21

Monday, October 24
  • Progressive Presidents
    • TR, Taft & Wilson
    • The Election of 1912

Tuesday, October 25
  • 2nd Hour: Video - Teddy Roosevelt

  • 7th Hour: The Failures of Progressivism
    • Females & African Americans
    • Reading & Notes

Wednesday, October 26

Thursday, October 27
  • Review for Progressive Era Quiz

Friday, October 28





Unit #3: Urbanization of America at the turn of the 19th Century
Quiz: Tuesday, October 11
I can statements:
  • I can explain why people wanted to move to cities at the turn of the 19th century.
  • I can identify problems associated with city life during the late 1800s and early 1900s.
  • I can describe what machine politics was and how federal, state, and local governments tried went about reforming themselves.
  • I can identify some of America’s “movers and shakers” of the early 1900s.

Wednesday, September 28

Thursday, September 29

Friday, September 30
  • Get Organized
  • Computer Lab
    • Complete Current Events
  • Discussion Post
    • Find and share three sources in regards to Urbanization during the late 19th century and early 20th century.
    • Provide a short annotation (description: 1-3 sentences) of what was good about the site
    • Please do not use:
      • Wikipedia
      • Encarta
      • or other classic "Encyclopedia"-type sites

Monday, October 3

Tuesday, October 4
  • Continue Urbanization Notes
  • Notes: Living Conditions of Cities (1880-1920)
    • DISCUSSION POST ASSIGNMENT:
      • Find three websites that deal with three different topics concerning urbanization at the turn of the 19th century (1880-1920).
      • Write a short annotation (1-3 sentences) describing the highlights of the website.
      • Please DO NOT use: Wikipedia, Encarta, or other "encyclopedia-type" sites.
    • The Cities
      • NYC
      • Chicago
      • San Francisco
    • Housing Problems
    • Mass Transportation
    • Water
    • Sanitation
    • Crime
    • Fire
    • Skyscrappers
    • Amusement Parks
    • The Bicycle
    • Tennis
    • Baseball
    • Boxing
    • The Newspaper

Wednesday, October 5
  • Continue Website Posts

Thursday, October 6
  • Continue Website Posts

Friday, October 7

Monday, October 10
  • Review Day: The Path to Enlightenment

Tuesday, October 11
  • Quiz: Urbanization of America at the Turn of the 19th Century


Unit #2: Industrialism & Immigration in the Gilded Age
Quiz: Friday, September 23

I can statements:

  • I can explain how industrial monopolies were created, the impact they had on workers, and the steps government took to limit them.
  • I can describe why immigrants wanted to come to the United States near the turn of the 20th Century and summarize the challenges they faced after their arrival.
  • I can compare the contrasting viewpoints of the Gilded Age.


Monday, September 12

Tuesday, September 13

Wednesday, September 14
  • Monopolies: How They Were Created, The Impact They Had On Workers, and Government Regulation

Thursday, September 15
  • Monopolies: How They Were Created, The Impact They Had On Workers, and Government Regulation

Friday, September 16
  • Constitution Day
    • The Declaration of Independence
    • The Preamble to the Constitution
    • The Bill of Rights
    • The Founding Fathers

Monday, September 19

Tuesday, September 20
  • Speed Dating: Labor Unions & Labor Union Violence

Wednesday, September 21
  • Review Day: Mr. Jorth Absent
    • Work with a partner & fill out your review sheet

Thursday, September 22
  • Video: Immigration during the Gilded Age
    • T-Chart Notes: Aha v. Duh
    • Ellis Island

Friday, September 23
  • Complete Immigration Video & Notes
  • HOMEWORK: SIGNED MID-TERM GRADE REPORT
    • EXTRA CREDIT: Email confirming parent/student conversation regarding the student's grade.
    • REQUIRED: completed Goal Sheet for full credit.

Monday, September 26
  • Social Darwinism v. Social Gospel Movement
    • Class Warfare during the Gilded Aged

Tuesday, September 27





Unit #1: Development of the West in the Late Nineteenth Century
1) Expansion and development of western railroads; 2) competitors for the West: miners, ranchers, homesteaders, and American Indians; 3) government policy toward American Indians; 4) gender, race, and ethnicity in the far West; 5) environmental impacts of western settlement

Tuesday, August 23
  • Review Syllabus & Classroom Expectations
  • Mr. Jorth's Website, Twitter, Current Events Assignments

Wednesday, August 24
  • p.1 What is History?
  • p.2 Why is it important to study History?

Thursday, August 25

Friday, August 26

Monday, August 29
  • Complete & Discuss Current Events Assignment

Tuesday, August 30

Wednesday, August 31

Thursday, September 1
  • Video: Sand Creek Massacre

Friday, September 2

Monday, September 5 (NO SCHOOL - LABOR DAY)


Tuesday, September 6
  • STUDY, STUDY, STUDY - QUIZ THURSDAY
  • Complete Moving West Graphic Organizer

Wednesday, September 7
Thursday, September 8
  • Quiz: Development of the West in the Late 19th Century


Friday, September 9 (HOMECOMING v. Lincoln)
  • September 11th Activity


HOW TO PROPERLY POST A CURRENT EVENT ARTICLE



Step #1: Go to the Discussion Tab within the US History page of Mr. Jorth’s Wiki: CLICK HERE

Step #2: In the “Search Posts” type “Your Name”; click on it to open your discussion posts

Step #3: Open a new “Web Browser” / Tab

Step #4: Choose a reputable new source – click on one of the hyperlinks below – and read a “Front Page” article or watch a “Front Page” news story.


Television:
ABC News: http://abcnews.go.com/
CBS News: http://www.cbsnews.com/
NBC News: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/
CNN: http://www.cnn.com/
Fox News: http://www.foxnews.com/

Local Television:
KCCI – Channel 8: http://www.kcci.com/index.html
WHO – Channel 13: http://www.whotv.com/
WOI – Channel 5: http://www.woi-tv.com/

Online Newspapers:
The Des Moines Register: http://www.desmoinesregister.com/
The Chicago Tribune: http://www.chicagotribune.com/
The New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/?src=hp1-0-H
The Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/

Online News Magazines:
TIME Magazine: http://www.time.com/time/
NEWSWEEK Magazine: http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek.html
The Economist: http://www.economist.com/
US NEWS & WORLD Report: http://www.usnews.com/

Television News Magazines:
20/20: http://abcnews.go.com/2020/
60 Minutes: http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/60minutes/main3415.shtml
Meet The Press: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032608/
Dateline: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032600/

National/International News Agencies:
Associated Press (AP): http://www.ap.org/
BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/
National Public Radio (NPR): http://www.npr.org/
Reuters: http://www.reuters.com/
Yahoo News: http://news.yahoo.com/


Step #5: Copy the Article URL

(example) http://news.yahoo.com/obama-making-final-push-blunt-palestinian-bid-070208844.html


Step #6: Return to “Your Discussion Page” on Mr. Jorth’s Wiki, and scroll to the bottom of the page

  • In the SUBJECT box: Type the ARTICLE TOPIC

    • Example from above:
      • SUBJECT: Obama – Israel & Palestine

  • In the REPLY Box: Paste the Article URLand
    • Type the WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN and CONNECTION TO HISTORY

    • Example from above:


      • WHO: President Obama

      • WHAT: Speech at the United Nations (UN)

      • WHERE: UN General Assembly in New York, NY

      • WHEN: Wednesday, September 21

      • CONNECTION: President Obama is calling for Palestinians to stop “pushing” for an independent state of Palestine within the current nation of Israel. This is a new position from the US government, considering that President George W. Bush met with Israeli and Palestinian leaders during his term and called on the two groups to work out a “two-state” solution to the nearly 70 year conflict. At numerous times over the course of the past 70 years America’s position on Israeli independence and Palestinian legitimacy has changed, this is just the latest development in the saga.

Step 7: Click the POST button.

Step 8: Tweet a link to your article, reference #jorthIHS and get one (1) point of extra credit.

Course Description:

United States History covers the time period from the 1870’s to present day. Significant people, events, and concepts will be discussed and analyzed. The development of the United States as a world power, and its current role and responsibility will be covered. Past foreign policy decisions will be discussed and related to present governmental policies. A central theme throughout the course will be cause and effect.

Iowa Core Curriculum History (9-12) Essential Concepts & Skills

  • Students will understand historical patterns, periods of time, and the relationship among these elements.
  • Students will understand how and why people create, maintain, or change systems of power, authority, and governance.
  • Students will understand the role of culture and cultural diffusion on the development and maintenance of societies.
  • Students will understand the role of individuals and groups within a society as promoters of change or the status quo.
  • Students will understand the effect of economic needs and wants on individual and group decisions.
  • Students will understand the effect of geographic factors on historical events.
  • Students will understand the role of innovation on the development and interaction of societies.
  • Students will understand cause and effect relationships and other historical thinking skills in order to interpret events and issues.

Indianola High School United States History Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to do basic research on both the internet and media center.
  • Students will give and organize presentations to the class.
  • Students will be able to read basic documents and answer questions about each.
  • Students will be able to recognize and explain how cause and effect impacts history and give examples to prove their position.
  • Students will be able to take a position on an event and defend their beliefs.
  • Students will evaluate major events from post-Civil War United States to the present.
  • Students will be able to explain the role the United States plays in the world today and briefly explain how we came to hold this position.

Topics of Study:

The following is a description of learning objectives for the major content areas to be investigated during both semesters of United States History. This listing is not intended to be exhaustive and units may be broken in to smaller divisions of study:

Unit #1: Development of the West in the Late Nineteenth Century
1) Expansion and development of western railroads; 2) competitors for the West: miners, ranchers, homesteaders, and American Indians; 3) government policy toward American Indians; gender, race, and ethnicity in the far West; 4) environmental impacts of western settlement

Unit #2: Industrial America in the Late Nineteenth Century
1) Corporate consolidation of industry; effects of technological development on the worker and workplace; 2) labor and unions; 3) national politics and influence of corporate power; 4) migration and immigration: the changing face of the nation; 5) proponents and opponents of the new order, e.g., Social Darwinism and Social Gospel

Unit #3: Urban Society in the Late Nineteenth Century
1) Urbanization and the lure of the city; 2) city problems and machine politics; 3) intellectual and cultural movements and popular entertainment

Unit #4: Populism and Progressivism
1) Agrarian discontent and political issues of the late nineteenth century; 2) origins of Progressive reform: municipal, state, and national; 3) Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson as Progressive presidents; 4) women’s roles: family, workplace, education, politics, and reform; 5) black America: urban migration and civil rights initiatives

Unit #5: The Emergence of America as a World Power
1) American imperialism: political and economic expansion; 2) war in Europe and American neutrality; 3) the First World War at home and abroad; 4) Treaty of Versailles; society and economy in the postwar years

Unit #6: The New Era: 1920s
1) The business of America and the consumer economy; 2) Republican politics: Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover; the culture of Modernism: science, the arts, and entertainment; 3) responses to Modernism: religious fundamentalism, nativism, and Prohibition; 4) the ongoing struggle for equality: African Americans and women

Unit #7: The Great Depression and the New Deal
1) Causes of the Great Depression; the Hoover administration’s response; 2) Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the New Deal; labor and union recognition; 3) the New Deal coalition and its critics from the Right and the Left; 4) surviving hard times: American society during the Great Depression

Unit #8: The Second World War
1) The rise of fascism and militarism in Japan, Italy, and Germany; 2) prelude to war: policy of neutrality; 3) the attack on Pearl Harbor and United States declaration of war; 4) fighting a multi-front war; diplomacy, war aims, and wartime conferences; 5) the United States as a global power in the Atomic Age

Unit #9: The Home Front During the War
1) Wartime mobilization of the economy;2) urban migration and demographic changes; women, work, and family during the war; 3) civil liberties and civil rights during wartime; 4) war and regional development; 5) expansion of government power

Unit #10: The United States and the Early Cold War
1) Origins of the Cold War; 2) Truman and containment; 3) the Cold War in Asia: China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan; 4) diplomatic strategies and policies of the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations; 5) the Red Scare and McCarthyism; impact of the Cold War on American society

Unit #11: The 1950s
1) Emergence of the modern civil rights movement; 2) the affluent society and “the other America”; 3) consensus and conformity: 4) suburbia and middle-class America; 5) social critics, nonconformists, and cultural rebels; 6) impact of changes in science, technology, and medicine

Unit #12: The Turbulent 1960s
1) From the New Frontier to the Great Society; 2) expanding movements for civil rights; 3) Cold War confrontations: Asia, Latin America, and Europe; 4) beginning of Détente; 5) the antiwar movement and the counterculture

Unit #13: Politics and Economics at the End of the Twentieth Century
1) The election of 1968 and the “Silent Majority”; Nixon’s challenges: Vietnam, China, and Watergate; 2) changes in the American economy: the energy crisis, deindustrialization, and the service economy; 3) the New Right and the Reagan revolution; 3) end of the Cold War

Unit #14: Society and Culture at the End of the Twentieth Century
1) Demographic changes: surge of immigration after 1965, Sunbelt migration, and the graying of America; 2) revolutions in biotechnology, mass communication, and computers; 3) politics in a multicultural society

Unit #15: The United States in the Post–Cold War World
1) Globalization and the American economy; 2) unilateralism vs. multilateralism in foreign policy; 3) domestic and foreign terrorism; 4) environmental issues in a global context